Scientology’s Vortex of Hate

Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard developed a complicated knack for sucking all who defied him or failed to comply with his dictates into a vortex of hate.  Virtually all of his closest associates who expressed the slightest doubt or disagreement with him were driven by Hubbard to wind up hating him with a vengeance.  A careful study of Hubbard’s history suggests the cycle was intended.  It garnered him all manner of hysterical calumny that he deftly turned into exhibits in demonstrating hate-filled ‘bias’ against  him and his creation, scientology.  And so it goes with his brainchild scientology and his successor David Miscavige.

In the early fifties Hubbard lectured to his followers that he considered that no group could survive for long absent a well-defined, hate-filled enemy.  He candidly admitted that he ‘chose’ psychiatry (generalized as ‘psychs’ to rope in virtually all mental healing arts and sciences) as scientology’s enemy out of convenience.  It worked well for a while.  Several prominent psychiatric and psychological societies worked feverishly to check or stop scientology in its tracks.  While the psychs were hard at it, scientology saw its greatest expansion, drawing close ranks to energetically fight off real (albeit largely self-created) threats to its survival.  Ironically, fifty years later scientologists came to believe as an article of religious faith that psychs are inherently evil, while psychs came to consider scientology little more than a harmless fringe cult.   Scientology sought refuge in the guise of religion and achieved a sort of immunity from the consequences of its crimes.  But it came at a cost, parking itself in time as a mid 20th Century anachronism.

As society itself evolved and hating lost its social acceptability, scientology lost its expansion-driving underdog, under-siege appeal and cohesiveness.  Its numbers have been gradually declining since the mid nineties when the last serious threat to its continued existence was overcome.   I use the term ‘last’ decidedly, notwithstanding the scientology infotainment blogs’ End of Days prophesying with the airing of ‘Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief.’  While the documentary will have an effect on the size of future potential new membership it will do little to change or alter scientology’s course.  (For more on that score, see Vice.com interview.)

Over time Hubbard and scientology fine-tuned their ethics system and organizational pattern to replicate its policies of hatred creation toward anyone who doubted or questioned any aspect of Hubbard or scientology.  The cycle seemed to go:  a) someone exposed scientology abuses or criticized its practices, b) scientology harassed the person to the point of driving him into a rage causing the whistleblower to become a crusader,  c) as scientology’s smears and attacks escalated in their audacity and dishonesty, the crusader naturally clustered with others similarly situated folks for support, (scientology all the while encouraged such clustering pursuant to principals set forth in Hubbard’s recommended text The Art of War) d)  as the cluster was then attacked as an ‘anti-scientology’ group,  its members developed a hate-filled culture, take scientology’s bait and start responding in kind, d) scientology then pointed to the character of hate-filled counter attacks as proof the attackers were haters.  Ultimately, haters hate, they wind up hating each other and the groups having no purpose beyond scientology’s demise accomplish little beyond steeling up scientologists to fight yet more battles.

You can see that same cycle playing out today.  Scientology forums read more and more like scientology’s propaganda sheet ‘Freedom.’  They are replete with name calling, expressing glee at every enemy faux pas, assigning evil motives to any and every enemy utterance or move, pronouncing hyperbolic end of days scenarios for the enemy, even targeting for distrust and enmity anyone who does not exhibit its own culturally devolved standards of ridicule and hate.  Their heaping praise and kudos on those mostly closely adhering to the company line verge on cult-like.  The tone, intelligence and tolerance levels are no different than scientology’s itself.  Their leaders have become as obsessed with scientology as scientology’s leading lights are.  Their sense of right and wrong becomes nearly identical (albeit reversed in vector) to scientology’s.

Scientology’s instilled ‘ethical’ values can be summed up in two clauses:  Whatever or whoever supports and forwards scientology is good; whatever or whoever detracts from scientology is evil.

Similarly, the anti-scientologists’ creed could read:  Whatever or whoever supports and forwards scientology (or, in extreme cases, is even neutral on the subject) is evil; whatever or whoever detracts from or attacks scientology is good.

Sadly, what apparently few of the former friends of Ron and ex-scientologists grasp is that when scientology successfully sucks one into its vortex of hate, one has lost and scientology has achieved its objective.

It is relatively easy to get former scientologists to go this route since they developed such simplistic denialist thinking patterns as scientologists.  They simply reverse the target and carry on as before in the comfort of a new group of like-minded pack members.

It is a regressive cycle.  It involves segregation, devolution, and descent.   It may give one an outlet for a cheap, temporary sense of relief, purpose or importance but at the end of the day it does not achieve its purported aims.   Paradoxically, it often has the reverse effect than that intended.  It winds up fueling scientology’s drive to expand numbers, resources and influence.  That perhaps is not surprising given the fact that that was scientology’s purpose for creating the vortex of hate in the first place.  Ultimately, scientology’s gloating, self-professed conquerors in fact wind up as unwitting agents of scientology itself.

Conversely, the only effective route to individual healing and growth is greater understanding.  Not surprisingly, it is the practitioners of that process that scientology attacks with the most resources and vigor.

Scientology and Religious Freedom Restoration Act

The blowback over Indiana governor Pence’s signing into law ‘The Religious Freedom Restoration Act’ has gone viral.   Prominent citizens, politicians and human rights groups are aghast as the act’s potential for instituting discrimination against those who don’t toe the line to fundamentalist Christian sexual orientation standards.  In defense of signing the act into law Indiana’s governor Pence has said it was based on the 1993 federal ‘Religious Freedom Restoration Act.’  See New York Times for more on the Act.

What perhaps few know is that one of the most energetic proponents of the federal act that serves as Indiana’s model was none other than the church of Scientology.  Scientology crows about its achievement on its own website:

“In 1991, Scientologists supported passage of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which was signed into law on November 16, 1993. The Church of Scientology International was an active member of the Coalition for the Free Exercise of Religion, a broad-based religious and civil liberties group that strenuously worked for passage of the act.”  Scientology website

Scientology was so involved in its passage that its president was invited to the White House for the President Clinton’s signing of the original federal act. (President Heber C. Jentzsch crowed about it on Larry King Live)

What scientology doesn’t tout is that it shamelessly exploited the Act even before its final enactment.  As it was wending its way through Congress, which scientology was directly and indirectly lobbying, scientology was using its imminent passage as leverage in obtaining tax exempt status from the Internal Revenue Service.

Scientology has used the federal Act for more than two decades to not only discriminate against the LGBT community, but also to immunize itself against charges ranging from human trafficking, to wrongful death, to fraud.

Scientology cited to the act in successfully dismissing criminal charges against it in the case of Lisa McPherson, a 36-year old woman who died in scientology’s custody on its premises.  St Petersburg Times

Recently scientology successfully argued for dismissal of a high profile lawsuit for fraud brought by former members in Tampa Florida, citing to the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act.  The Underground Bunker

Coincidentally, the highly publicized documentary ‘Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief’ premieres this Sunday on HBO.  Its director and producer have both been quoted far and wide of late questioning how scientology gets away with the abuses they chronicle in the film (including its tax exempt status).  They need only examine more closely the current media fire emanating in Indiana to find a considerable part of the answer.  Folks concerned with the Religious Freedom Restoration Act who look deeper might find that it potentially carries far more grave consequences than currently meet the eye.

The Active Ingredient in Scientology

The most active ingredient in scientology is not of scientology.  It was with us long before L. Ron Hubbard.  It has evolved and will continue to long after scientology ceases to attract headlines.  The seed of scientology’s rise and fall is Hubbard’s and scientology’s manic efforts and extreme measures taken to bottle and own and sell it (reference ‘Truth’).   This point is fleshed out a bit more in the latest post at the The Underground Bunker.

It is discussed in greater detail with Larry Flick on the Morning Jolt on sirius xm.  To listen to it do the following:

a. Go to the following link, Morning Jolt.

b. Go to the green bar ‘OutQ on SoundCloud.’

c. Scroll to ‘Marty Rathbun Blows The Lid Off Scientology…’

Scientology Wiretaps Cruise/Kidman Home

Hear the details:

NBC Today Show

Austin Film Society and Going Clear

I want to acknowledge and thank Alex Gibney, Larry Wright, Evan Smith (Texas Tribune), and Richard Linklater and the Austin Film Society for hosting, conducting, and participating in an intelligent public conversation on scientology. Such are rare these days.  Austin Film Society Facebook page images.  Keep Austin Weird.

 

False Prophets

Any teacher or prophet who does not genuinely wish, encourage and enable students or adherents to ultimately learn and discover beyond what he has to impart is really no teacher or prophet at all.

False teachers and prophets use the learning process as a means to control or enslave rather than to empower or free.

No matter how eloquent or compelling a teacher or prophet may appear to be, whether he is leading one to heaven, purgatory, perdition or ignorance can be predicted by applying this simple standard.

Scientology Losing Its Teeth

It is heartening to see that established, credible media is now seeing the reality of what we set out to accomplish six years ago and suggested we had accomplished a year ago.

On 10 February 2014 we posted Miscavige’s Obsession With the Rathbuns.

On 24 February 2015 the New York Times posted Scientology’s Chilling Effect.