Category Archives: disconnection

The Scientology Inquisition

David Miscavige and his Scientology Inc. have of late  taken to waving the flags of the American Nazi Party and the  Westboro Baptist Church.   They are spending huge sums in order to convince some that their own activity belongs in the same category as those august institutions.  They don’t even try to argue that their conduct is not outrageous or unconscionable in a civilized society. Instead, they claim it is their Constitutional right to practice retribution, terrorism and ruination upon those who refuse to relinquish their own First Amendment rights to speak and worship as they choose.

Regardless of their individual failures or successes in this expensive positioning endeavor, there is legal precedent that protects you should you ever be targeted by the Scientology Inquisition.  It is the decision of the California Court of Appeals in the original Wollersheim vs. Church of Scientology of California case.

The following is a reprint of the particular section of that decision that deals with Scientology heretics and their treatment at the hands of the Scientology Inquisition:

B. Even Assuming the Retributive Conduct Sometimes Called “Fair Game” Is a Core Practice of Scientology It Does Not Qualify for Constitutional Protection

As we have seen, not every religious expression is worthy of constitutional protection. To illustrate, centuries ago the inquisition was one of the core religious practices of the Christian religion in Europe. This religious practice involved torture and execution of heretics and miscreants. (See generally Peters, Inquisition (1988); Lea, The Inquisition of the Middle Ages (1961).) Yet should any church seek to resurrect the inquisition in this country under a claim of free religious expression, can anyone doubt the constitutional authority of an American government to halt the torture and executions? And can anyone seriously question the right of the victims of our hypothetical modern day inquisition to sue their tormentors for any injuries – physical or psychological – they sustained?

We do not mean to suggest Scientology’s retributive program as described in the evidence of this case represented a full-scale modern day “inquisition.” Nevertheless, there are some parallels in purpose and effect. “Fair game” like the “inquisition” targeted “heretics” who threatened the dogma and institutional integrity of the mother church. Once “proven” to be a “heretic,” an individual was to be neutralized. In medieval times neutralization often meant incarceration, torture, and death. (Peters, Inquisition, supra, pp. 57, 65-67, 87, 92-94, 98, 117-118, 133-134; Lea, The Inquisition of the Middle Ages, supra, pp. 181, 193-202, 232-236, 250-264, 828-829.) As described in the evidence at this trial the “fair game” policy neutralized the “heretic” by stripping this person of his or her economic, political and psychological power. (See, e.g., *889 Allard v. Church of Scientology (1976) 58 Cal.App.3d 439, 444 [129 Cal.Rptr. 797] [former church member falsely accused by Church of grand theft as part of “fair game” policy, subjecting member to arrest and imprisonment].)

In the instant case, at least, the prime focus of the “fair game” campaign was against the “heretic” Wollersheim’s economic interests. Substantial evidence supports the inference Scientology set out to ruin Wollersheim’s photography enterprise. Scientologists who worked in the business were instructed to resign immediately. Scientologists who were customers were told to stop placing orders with the business. Most significantly, those who owed money for previous orders were instructed to renege on their payments. Although these payments actually were going to a factor not Wollersheim, the effect was to deprive Wollersheim of the line of credit he needed to continue in business.

Appellant argues these “fair game” practices are protected religious expression. They cite to a recent Ninth Circuit case upholding the constitutional right of the Jehovah’s Witness Church and its members to “shun” heretics from that religion even though the heretics suffer emotional injury as a result. ( Paul v. Watchtower Bible & Tract Soc. of New York, supra, 819 F.2d 875.) In this case a former Jehovah’s Witness sued the church and certain church leaders for injuries she claimed to have suffered when the church ordered all other church members to “shun” her. In the Jehovah Witness religion, “shunning” means church members are prohibited from having any contact whatsoever with the former member. They are not to greet them or conduct any business with them or socialize with them in any manner. Thus, there was a clear connection between the religious practice of “shunning” and Ms. Paul’s emotional injuries. Nonetheless, the trial court dismissed her case. The Ninth Circuit affirmed in an opinion which expressly held “shunning” is a constitutionally protected religious practice. “[T]he defendants, … possess an affirmative defense of privilege – a defense that permits them to engage in the practice of shunning pursuant to their religious beliefs without incurring tort liability.” ( Id. at p. 879.)

We first note another appellate court has taken the opposite view on the constitutionality of “shunning.” ( Bear v. Reformed Mennonite Church (1975) 462 Pa. 330 [341 A.2d 105].) In this case the Pennsylvania Supreme Court confronted a situation similar to Paul v. Watchtower Bible & Tract Soc. of New York. The plaintiff was a former member of the Mennonite Church. He was excommunicated for criticizing the church. Church leaders ordered that all members must “shun” the plaintiff. As a result, both his business and family collapsed. The appellate court reversed the trial court’s dismissal of the action, holding: “In our opinion, the complaint, … raises issues that the ‘shunning’ practice of appellee church and the conduct of the *890 individuals may be an excessive interference within areas of ‘paramount state concern,’ i.e., the maintenance of marriage and family relationship, alienation of affection, and the tortious interference with a business relationship, which the courts of this Commonwealth may have authority to regulate, even in light of the ‘Establishment’ and ‘Free Exercise’ clauses of the First Amendment.” ( Bear v. Reformed Mennonite Church, supra, 341 A.2d at p. 107, italics in original.)

We observe the California Supreme Court has cited with apparent approval the viewpoint on “shunning” expressed in Bear v. Mennonite Church, supra, rather than the one adopted in Paul v. Watchtower Bible & Tract Soc. of New York, supra. (See Molko v. Holy Spirit Assn., supra, 46 Cal.3d 1092, 1114.) But even were Paul v. Watchtower Bible & Tract Soc. of New York the law of this jurisdiction it would not support a constitutional shield for Scientology’s retribution program. In the instant case Scientology went far beyond the social “shunning” of its heretic, Wollersheim. Substantial evidence supports the conclusion Scientology leaders made the deliberate decision to ruin Wollersheim economically and possibly psychologically. Unlike the plaintiff in Paul v. Watchtower Bible & Tract Soc. of New York, Wollersheim did not suffer his economic harm as an unintended byproduct of his former religionists’ practice of refusing to socialize with him any more. Instead he was bankrupted by a campaign his former religionists carefully designed with the specific intent it bankrupt him. Nor was this campaign limited to means which are arguably legal such as refusing to continue working at Wollersheim’s business or to purchase his services or products. Instead the campaign featured a concerted practice of refusing to honor legal obligations Scientologists owed Wollersheim for services and products they already had purchased.

If the Biblical commandment to render unto Caesar what is Caesar’s and to render unto God what is God’s has any meaning in the modern day it is here. Nothing in Paul v. Watchtower Bible & Tract Soc. of New York or any other case we have been able to locate even implies a religion is entitled to constitutional protection for a campaign deliberately designed to financially ruin anyone – whether a member or nonmember of that religion. Nor have we found any cases suggesting the free exercise clause can justify a refusal to honor financial obligations the state considers binding and legally enforceable. One can only imagine the utter chaos that could overtake our economy if people who owed money to others were entitled to assert a freedom of religion defense to repayment of those debts. It is not unlikely the courts would soon be flooded with debtors who claimed their religion prohibited them from paying money they owed to others.

We are not certain a deliberate campaign to financially ruin a former member or the dishonoring of debts owed that member qualify as “religious *891 practices” of Scientology. But if they do, we have no problem concluding the state has a compelling secular interest in discouraging these practices. (See pp. 884-886, supra.) Accordingly, we hold the freedom of religion guaranties of the United States and California Constitutions do not immunize these practices from civil liability for any injuries they cause to “targets” such as Wollersheim.

For further parallels between Miscavige’s Scientology Inc. and the perpetrators of the original Grand Inquisition, see The Scientology Reformation

Scientology Ethics Deconstructed

For those who don’t frequent Tony Ortega’s Underground Bunker, there is an excellent series running on the scientology ethics system.  It is a series of interviews with Jefferson Hawkins.  Jeff deconstructs the system and exposes it as more of a means of control than an attempt to upgrade personal and organizational integrity.  I suggest you read the interview segments in order as Jeff analyzes the Introduction to Scientology Ethics book from beginning to end.

1.        Opening interview.

2.       The Optimum Solution.

3.       Honesty.

4.      Statistics.

5.     Conditions.

6.     Suppressive Persons.

7.     PTSness.

8.    Knowledge Reports – institutionalized snitching.

9.    High crimes and misdemeanors – the justice code.

10.  Justice proceedings.

 

Breaking Free

Breaking free from sophisticated mind control is not easy.  I don’t think I have seen anyone do so in as bold and spectacular a fashion as Leah Remini has.  Tony Ortega breaks it down at the Scientology Underground Bunker.  I hope folks who have been (or are) similarly situated appreciate what Leah is doing for them at considerable personal risk to herself.

Scientology and Psychiatry

We concluded the last post here, Scientology and Misogyny, with the following words:

Regardless, there is little question that the church of Scientology and its 30-year-tenured supreme leader David Miscavige are so misogynist as to qualify as anachronistic, if not outside of the law and boundaries of common societal mores on the subject of the sexes.  We will shed more light on this subject over the next several days.

Now, let’s address some facts.

Lori Hodgson visited with us in April 2011.  She was there on 18 April when the Squirrelbusters (SQBs) first arrived.   I had already just learned quite a bit about the leaders of the original SQB crew prior to their arrival. That is because one of the reasons for Lori’s visit was to heal from the terror they had already individually and collectively visited upon Lori.  I was going to publish this article while Lori was with us, but we held off because Lori considered it might not help at that time in her ongoing efforts to reunite with her two children that had recently been estranged from her.  We both agree that publication is now appropriate.

Hearing Lori’s story in full reminded me quite a bit of the Clint Eastwood directed movie Changeling. Eastwood accurately and brutally depicts early/mid 20th Century psychiatry used as a corrupt, political tool by the powerful and greedy. The movie is based on a true story.  Watching it a second time, and comparing it against what Lori and others have been subjected to by the church of Scientology made me recognize that Scientology has come full circle. In some ways it has become worse than that which it so blindly and aggressively resisted for so long: 1950’s institutional psychiatry.

Lori Hodgson did not have her family knocked apart by random, unfortunate circumstances.  She was subjected to Black Dianetics in the worst sense of the word, including Pain, Drug and Hypnosis techniques.   It was carefully planned, artfully and then overtly and quite intentionally executed.

Two key characters in this story were participants on the bizarre raid on my home conducted on April 18th 2011 (which raids continued unabated daily for 199 days), see Squirrelbusters: Day One.  Mark Warlick, the silent one, with the camera at the bottom of the stairs, was the Director of Special Affairs Los Gatos Scientology Organization that day. John Allender was the gang leader – a go-to OSA (Office of Special Affairs –the dirty tricks and propaganda arm of corporate Scientology) field operative.  Allender’s ‘security rating’ as an OSA operative was certified by Warlick with these words, ‘I trust him with my life.’

Lori’s former husband is a man by the name of Jim Leake.  He is pals with Allender and Warlick, mainly by virtue of being a good, reliable, ‘OSA-volunteering’ Scientologist in the San Jose area. John Allender’s wife Lynda – as “Senior Case Supervisor” was overseeing Lori’s Case Supervisor (the Scientology authority who closely supervises auditing sessions, including the intimate states of her client’s minds) through much of her “auditing” in the church.

These characters – and others – conspired over three years to steal Lori’s daughter and son, protect a dead beat dad (whom many states prosecute and jail for extended periods of time), and intimidate so as to obstruct Lori from exercising her legal rights to remedy the injustices.  All the while they used Scientology ‘philosophy’ and ‘technology’ to cave her in in an effort to make her think it was she that was lacking spiritually and mentally in demanding that truth and justice prevail. Just as institutional psychiatry was used in dealing with the woman portrayed by Angelina Jolie in Changeling.

In late 2008 – while in the middle of her Dianetics auditing program with the Church of Scientology (as supervised by Lynda Allender), Lori required invasive knee surgery.   The first surgery was a gross case of medical malpractice.   The problem that was supposed to be cured was exacerbated, leaving Lori crippled and in chronic pain.  But Lori was discouraged from seeking redress, since the  doctor was a renowned surgeon whose former wife and two kids were on staff at Los Gatos org.   He was known not to be too happy with that state of affairs and apparently the church didn’t want that sleeping dog disturbed.  Lori had the first surgery corrected in 2009 – which involved extremely intense work to remove the previous surgical product and replace it properly.   Both surgeries necessitated Lori taking pain killers over extended periods.

While Lori was being hooked up to IVs with pain killing drugs in preparation for the  (first) extensive knee surgery, her former husband Jim Leake was frantically attempting to solve his several year old potential criminal prosecution for violation of dead beat dad statutes.  Jim had been in continual arrears on child support for the daughter and son Lori had born and raised, since shortly after 2006 (Lori divorced Jim in 2002.) Jim was creating that debt while continually pitching in at every insistence by the likes of the Allenders and Warlick and their Scientology brethren.  Jim’s solution fit hand in glove with the intentions of the Scientology organization.  And pursuant to the Scientology ethics system, since Jim’s aims paralleled the Scientology organization interests, he would be backed by the full power of the organization and Lori would be treated as fair game for personal destruction.

Through brainwashing, coercion and fear tactics Jim was seeking to get Lori’s children into the Sea Org, before they developed the maturity to evaluate right and wrong for themselves. In this scenario Scientology would win netting two new second generation Scientologists for a lifetime of unpaid labor, and Jim would win, ‘because how is Lori going to demand child support when he’s deposited both of their children (without a proper education) into Scientology’s ‘religious’ order?’

Before Lori’s surgery ordeal Jim and the Scientology org had already accomplished this with Lori’s then-15 year old daughter Jessica.  One day she announced to her mother that she would never go to school again. That was when Jessica was an honor student and was clearly enjoying her traditional education.  It was also after high pressure recruitment sessions Jim arranged with Los Gatos org staff.   After 6 months of fighting this Lori finally agreed that her daughter could go to a Scientology school to finish High School.  Little did she know that recruiters had arranged for, and executed, her daughter to ‘graduate’ in 3 months at the age of 16 and signed a five-year Scientology staff contract.  That same year her daughter got home sick while on full-time study at Flag and came home to San Jose; she was straddled with a 12-13,000 dollar debt at age 16.

While Lori was flat on her back recovering from (her 1st) surgery, Jim took Lori’s 15 year old son Jeremy to a three hour high-pressure session with Sea Org recruiters.  Following the event, Jim and Scientology recruiters sent Jeremy to Lori’s house demanding that she sign away her parental rights so that he could join the Sea Org.  While Lori was recovering, in intense pain and while on heavy pain killers, Jim and the recruiters kept sending Jeremy after Lori pestering her to sign the papers.  Finally, a group of Sea Org recruiters arrived unannounced at Lori’s home, and while she was in excruciating pain in the bathroom, they pounded on her front door shouting and demanding entry (much like the Allender crew did at my home on April 18th 2011).  Lori attempted to protest this activity, but her own auditor – the one working under the Snr C/S Lynda Allender – persuaded her to shut up. Lori continued to protest, but Lynda Allender (Senior C/S) ignored her pleas and ordered her to focus on her ‘Scientology assists.’

Just two weeks before the second surgery Lori finally succumbed to the collective pressure and complied with demands that she sign parental consent for Jeremy to join the Sea Org.

After the messy, complicated second knee surgery, on day two in recovery at the hospital, Lori’s daughter was sent in to tell her mother ‘good bye’, informing she was leaving for the Sea Organization (to fulfill a billion year contract she had signed).

Jeremy  lasted only 7 months in the Sea Org.  He cried many nights to come home, but never was allowed to tell his mom.  He finally did come home.  But when she tried to remedy whatever he had experienced in the Sea Org that caused him so much terror and grief, she was rebuffed because Jeremy was forced to sign a non-disclosure bond that threatened him with a $3 million fine if he told his mother anything about his Sea Org experience.

Jessica lasted even less time in the Sea Org.

After recovering, Lori attempted to pursue Jim Leake for his nearly two years of delinquent child support payments.  The Director of Special Affairs Mark Warlick stalled her from going to court using Scientology policy against ‘suing’ fellow Scientologists as authority. Finally, in 2010 Lori began to educate herself on the Black Dianetics nature of the Scientologist church.  She traveled to Corpus Christi for a few day visit with Carol Kramer, Mosey and myself.   She resolved to return to utilize Dianetics and Scientology techniques to remedy her engrammic Scientology church experiences.

Three Camp Fire Girls Dishin'

Lori with Monique and Carol at Casablanca

Within a day of her return to San Jose Lori was stalked, assaulted, and threatened by John Allender.   Allender hid in the (parking lot) by her office and spied on her for hours. When he saw her leave for the day and that she was alone, he assaulted her and threatened her in the parking lot, asking ‘how do you like beatings?’

Lori’s daughter Jessica and son Jeremy were then put into long, mind control sessions with Rick Melrose at the San Jose Mission.  Rick with the help of Jim Leake, convinced Jessica and Jeremy to disconnect from their mother.  They also convinced them that Lori was “imagining” that John Allender had assaulted her, that there was something wrong mentally with Lori. Jeremy was so viciously brainwashed that he coolly looked Lori in the eye and told her that it was her reactive mind telling her that Allender had assaulted her. Taking the pre-1950s psychiatric abuse of Changeling to a whole new level, not only the ‘practitioners’, but the child of the target was recruited  to convince his truth-telling mother that she was crazy.

On the morning of 18 April 2011, Lori and I had a long counseling session where we addressed all of the above – attempting to mitigate and repair the pain and suffering she had been subjected to.   When we broke for lunch, the Scientology team of Allender, Warlick and two other thugs with cameras – dressed out of some ugly, nightmarish implant – stormed my home.   The very day of the raid Lori received papers from Jim Leake’s attorney – clearly paid for by the church or at its direction – since Leake cannot even see fit to pay for his children’s upbringing.  The papers announced Jim was going to vigorously oppose Lori’s attempt to have her rights vindicated in court.   The four creeps being sent to Corpus Christi was clearly timed to prevent Lori’s personal recovery and also to intimidate her into dropping charges that were pending – an attempt to cut her  trip short so that she would have to return home to continue her legal battle against dead beat Leake.

Many people have speculated why I momentarily appeared to lose my temper during this incident and rip the microphone out of Allender’s hand when I learned his identity.   Perhaps this sheds more light on the context.  Less than ten minutes earlier Lori had run through Allender’s previous stalking and threats leveled against her in San Jose. Lori was frighteningly watching and listening to this entire incident as it was happening right outside her window in the downstairs apartment just behind me in the video.

Lori pursued the court action to remedy the law mandated 60% child custody Lori was deprived of by Scientology and Leake’s causing Jeremy and Jessica to disconnect from their mother.  Lori also sought to raise the issue of her son being made to sign a $3 million gag order upon leaving the Sea Org. Scientology and Leake ultimately dragged out the war against Lori until after her son Jeremy turned 18.  While Lori was awarded financial restitution, by the time Jeremy turned eighteen the court was powerless to do anything about the forced disconnection of her children.

To appreciate how Scientology has come to the complete dramatization of becoming that which it so vigorously resisted, please watch the movie Changeling.  Please review the facts here.  Please confront what has happened to your erstwhile “church.” It has apparently become an institution resembling the mid 20th century state institutional psychiatry it spends millions railing against. Wake up.

Real Emotions

Somewhere along the way emotion was converted into equating with states or levels of consciousness in Scientology.  In the process emotion became a negative humanoid attribute, e.g. writing off any feeling or expression of emotion off as ‘human emotion and reaction’ or ‘h, e and r.’

Emotion and grades of awareness or consciousness are not the same thing.

Wikipedia gives a good definition for emotion that was no doubt contributed to by a number of interested people from a variety of religious, philosophical, scientific and educational backgrounds.  It is as follows:

In psychology and philosophy, emotion is a subjective, conscious experience that is characterized primarily by psychophysiological expressions, biological reactions, and mental states. Emotion is often associated and considered reciprocally influential with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation,as well as influenced by hormones and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, oxytocin, cortisol and GABA. Emotion is often the driving force behind motivation, positive or negative.

That definition is not inconsistent with Scientology definitions, even if it is far more comprehensive.

The last sentence bears some thought, ‘Emotion is often the driving force behind motivation, positive or negative.’    Carl Rogers has noted that emotion can serve as an important referent to deriving meaning.  For example, an issue that confronts you causes sadness.   In processing that emotion, it might inform your conscience and influence you to decide to do something worthy about the situation.  That in turn could result in your feeling some more pleasurable emotions.

If instead you used a mental trick to lift you out of sadness, you may well simply feel comfortable – in the short run – in forgetting that which made you sad.  Your conscience is bypassed in the equation; and the situation that perhaps legitimately engendered feelings of sadness remains unaddressed.   Would that be ethical?  Would that be pro-survival?  You’d have to think of examples of real situations and work it out for yourself.

Imagine habitually utilizing exercises that rose you from genuine emotions caused by real situations that confronted you.   What would ultimately happen to your conscience?   How real and worthy and meaningful a life would you wind up living?

Perhaps because emotion is mistaken for a level, grade, or state of consciousness in Scientology the culture tends to frown on having, demonstrating or processing emotions per se.  They certainly are not recognized as anything worthy of serving as a referent to deriving meaningful meaning.  Emotion instead becomes something to get out of, something to rise above, or something to manipulate in others.  Techniques abound in Scientology for achieving that.  Nothing wrong with such tools provided they are used wisely.  When I say wisely, I mean not done so habitually and consistently that one becomes emotionless.  In Scientology cultures, folks can become downright anti-emotional to the point where conscience is effectively forfeited.  That would seem to be a factor in Scientologists’ facile ability to turn their backs on loved ones, associates, family, and  friends; and even to proudly avow to never fear to hurt another in a just cause.

If you’ve been in Scientology culture for very long, I invite you to have and process for yourself some real emotion.  Don’t try to repress it, suppress it, avoid it, evade it, escape it, conquer it or ‘causatively’ rise above it.  Instead, feel it for all it is worth.  See for yourself whether sometimes emotion can inform your conscience and your decisions and lead to more rewarding and meaningful activity on your part.

Why Bother?

Some hard-core ‘independent’ Scientologists have ruminated  among themselves lately the idea that I am somehow trying to bring down L. Ron Hubbard and Scientology.  Otherwise, they reason,  ‘why wouldn’t he just move on and let it be?’   I am going to try to address this concern as directly and succinctly as I can.

L. Ron Hubbard developed a number of unique, aggressive methods for tackling problems of the human psyche.   Used intelligently there is nothing that compares to their direct, predictable effectiveness in intensifying present awareness.

However, there is a potential trap in the fields of therapy and spiritual practices discussed by Ken Wilber in his Kosmic Consciousness interview series that applies in spades to Scientology.  In segment eight of the series, Wilber speaks of people attaining ecstatic, exalted altered states in their particular discipline that they consider to be so miraculous as to be without compare.  They are convinced that they have found the only way, which results in a sort of tunnel vision and puts a figurative ceiling on their own continued growth and development.  Such people become opinionated, exclusive and intolerant – ultimately repelling others from experiencing the transcendence they experienced and losing whatever they gained in the process.

This trap is particularly acute in Scientology, because along with the peak and plateau experiences it delivers, its scripture is saturated with reinforcement of this sense of only-one way and superiority to mere mortals.  As intensively and effectively as Scientology can focus an individual’s attention and concentration, it just as intensively and effectively conditions those new found abilities onto worshipping and defending to the death the construct that made them possible.

In an ironic way, the zealous, judgmental, super egoic, ‘I will save you if I have to kill you’ mentality of the advanced Scientologist serves as testament to the effectiveness of that which they are hell-bent on defending and promoting.

Just as assuredly, it is evidence that somewhere along the line the science of ‘knowing how to know’ is converted into the practice of ‘knowing so best that we had better not be exposed to learning anything else and not allow anyone else to either’.

The observation I am trying to share is that it is this vicious cycle that is at the root of the demise of the methodologies of Dianetics and Scientology.  It is the cause of every other ill – disconnection, fair game, Simon Bolivar, violence in management, money is everything,  image is everything, you name it – every other ‘situation’ that folk continually mistake for the ‘why.’

I have witnessed tremendous relief, rehabilitated ability to learn, and renewed capacity for transcendence by getting this ‘why’ understood by many who have devoted their lives to Scientology.   I have also effectively helped a number of people with Hubbard methods by using them – sans the only-one religious indoctrination;  people who knew little to nothing of Dianetics and Scientology when they came to me.

It is for this reason that I believe the ideas of L. Ron Hubbard are doomed to the extent they are not used in an integral (integrated) fashion.   The whole package – taken as the whole package requires it be taken – leads inevitably to all of the ills ex-scientologists, those effected by Scientologists, and Scientologists (including and especially independent ones) seem to make a pastime out of clamoring about.

Why do I bother?  Because I want to help free those who are stuck in this Scientology dichotomy, and because I don’t want to see the demise of ideas and discoveries that can be effective in helping people in the future.

The Great Decompression

I borrowed, or coined by inspiration, from Viktor Frankl (Man’s Search For Meaning) the idea that decompression was the first and most important step in recovering from the Scientology experience with an upward trajectory.  Frankl – having himself survived years of imprisonment in Nazi concentration camps, and attempted to help others similarly situated upon release – noted that an adjustment period was critical for someone coming out of a strictly controlled environment to a relatively free society.  He likened it to a deep sea diver submerged for several hours far beneath the surface.  One must bring the diver back out from under the tremendous pressure he has adjusted to on a gradient basis or he will suffer from Decompression Sickness, also known as the bends. Similarly, if a person imprisoned – even mentally – in inhumane conditions, conditioned to think and act in super-compliant ways while developing all manner of deceitful (albeit as justifiable as they may be) means to survive, comes out acting like he owns earth he is going to be in for big, ugly and possibly devastating losses.

Over time I have exchanged observations with other counselors about a number of folks that we guided and assisted through the Scientology Underground Railroad – or Decompression Road.  One pattern we all have observed, and taken terrible losses on, is Scientologists entering the family of humanity with the exclusive, arrogant and judgmental attitudes they developed to survive in Scientology culture.  All of us have expended a great deal of resource and effort in helping to clean up messes such attitudes have created, and in getting people who exhibit those attitudes back on their paths after the inevitable smack downs society tends to deliver in response.   For those going through that process now, and who are discomforted absent orientation to L. Ron Hubbard references, everything I have noted thus far in this article is in complete accord with Scientology notions of the efficacy of tackling problems,development and life on a gradient scale; and even the ethics conditions formulas (see Non- Existence condition and formula).

One of the first posts on the Milestone 2/iscientology blog – created largely in protest of my books and this forum – was a piece attempting to discredit this idea of decompression as some psych-based attempt to belittle Operating Thetans and put people at introverted effect.  It reasoned that former Sea Org members and public OTs who bought into the idea they could use a tad of decompression as part of their gradient entry into the community of fellow human beings were victims of an attempt to put them at groveling effect of the psych-indoctrinated ‘wog’ world.  By God, the MS2ers proclaimed, we need to bring society up to our standards, Revenimus! (In keeping perhaps with the Class VIII indoctrination, ‘you are the people who own the planet’ – see Memoirs of a Scientology Warrior).  This mentality of wanting to cling to the inside is understandable (see e.g. the films  The Shawshank Redemption and One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest – I know you have all seen them, but watch them again with the Scientology experience in mind).

These thoughts arose when considering a general response to the many inquiries I have received lately asking me which of my three books ought to be read in what sequence.   That includes a lot of non-Scientologists asking what book might appeal to or help a Scientologist family member or friend. My answer is always a question, eliciting information on where the person is at on the decompression process.  When I know something about their circumstances I can recommend the single book that I think might help the person concerned.  They do not necessarily flow one to the next in the order they were written.  And all three of them aren’t for everybody necessarily.

So here is a short generalized guide to whom I believe the three books individually might appeal to, and hopefully help  –  in alignment to degrees of decompression already experienced by the concerned person.

The Scientology Reformation.

This book was written primarily with Scientologists still connected with the church in mind.  It is anchored upon L. Ron Hubbard references and attempts, on a gradient basis, to get a Scientologist to observe for himself or herself just how far adrift Scientology Inc has strayed from the intent and purposes memorialized (at least in some places) by its founder.  It introduces hope that one need not reject all of Scientology, in order to escape and even to take a stand against its abuses.

What Is Wrong With Scientology? Healing Through Understanding

This book would likely be dropped like a radioactive rock by the time a Scientologist in good standing read the first sentence of the introduction.   It is addressed more to people who are already out of the church, and for whom turning back is no option.  It is a detailed presentation and analysis of the features of Scientology that tend toward entrapment.   It describes in some detail the sum and substance of what Scientology’s effective processes are  in order to set the table for analyzing what is wrong with it and how it is ultimately used to entrap.   If one only mindlessly makes a break and declares a wholesale rejection of everything scientology, one tends to become as glued to it as ever, albeit from the opposition vector.  That is because he or she never took the time to understand and come to grips with what salutary aspects of it may have kept one pursuing it in the first place.  If one understands that, one can transcend the experience in a more desirable state than victimhood.

Memoirs of a Scientology Warrior

Because of the personal, autobiographical nature of this book and its consequent gradual, real time and subjective introduction to Scientology this can inform someone never involved in the subject with a perspective they will get nowhere else.  That is, what attracts and keeps one involved in the subject.   Popular books and films have been woefully two-dimensional and inaccurate in that regard.  They only focus on fear factors, which for those involved had next to zero effect in garnering their voluntary, self-determined involvement (the involvement that creates the most lasting effect on someone).  Many who have read it remarked that reading another’s real time experience of getting into, developing into a crusader for, and then transcending out of it prompted them to review their own experience more honestly, fully and rationally.  And that had a liberating effect upon them.

Memoirs is probably akin to a post-doctorate extension of the ‘what is wrong with Scientology’ analysis.  But not with a lot of opinion.  For the most part I let the facts do the talking.

While I still regularly use the term, and the model, of ‘decompression’ I am more often using it with a modifier to better describe what it is I am trying to accomplish: Decompression with an upward trajectory.

Link to all three books:

Mark Rathbun books on scientology